Sela

Snare Cajon Kit

3 in stock

Sela

Snare Cajon Kit

3 in stock

UK Delivery

£4.95

Standard delivery within 3 working days

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Description

Sela Snare Cajon Kit The Snare Cajon Kit from Sela means you can build a professional sounding Cajon in very short time while having a lot of fun, and you don't need to be a gifted craftsman because the precisely prefabricated parts make the assembly very easy. Each step is well documented in the included manual and after only around three hours your Cajon will be ready to be played. Even if you have never built a Cajon before you will have a professional instrument that sounds amazing with its deep bass and crisp snare sound and is a joy to play. Specifications: - Measurements: ca. 47 x 30 x 30 cm - Package: ca. 49 x 33 x 8 cm - Technique: 1 adjustable Snare - Playing Surface: Poplar veneer, 3 mm - Resonance Body: 11 layers Birch, 15 mm - Footing: Nonslip Rubber Feet - Weight: ca. 5,85 kg - incl. all Tools and Material - incl. detailed Manual - incl. Cajon Method with CD HISTORY From the tea chest to the cajon. A brief history of the modern Cajon. A cajon (pronounced "ca-hon", Spanish for box or crate) is made of wood and has a hollow cuboid form. The main playing surface is the front panel and most cajons have a sound hole in the opposite panel at the back. Cajons come in various different shapes and sizes, but are generally intended to be used with the player sitting on top. The idea of drumming on a box originated during the 19th century under colonial rule in Peru. The Africans who had been abducted to the new world were not permitted to bring their drums. Onof the reasons was that their masters feared the slaves would use them to communicate and foment rebellion. However, rhythmic music is such an integral part of African cultural identity that it was impossible to completely suppress it and the slaves began drumming on transport crates. These were readily available and it was scarcely possible to prevent contact with them. In particular the different sizes of tea chests then in use are reflected in the designs of modern cajons. In the course of time the cajon became firmly established in flamenco and spread with this music and dance form throughout Europe. The first prominent musician to use the cajon on stage was probably the percussionist accompanying Paco de Lucia in the 1960s. Since then the cajon has continued to grow in popularity and is now used in virtually every style of music.